Friday 22 July 2011

 

NDP needs to launch a Culture War

to counter Harper's false mythology

The party can grow by showing it's more in tune with Canadian values

By Murray Dobbin
TheTyee.ca
   
  Cartoon by Ingrid Rice  

18 July, 2011 — Back in April, 2010, EKOS pollster Frank Graves got into a lot of trouble in the neo-con blogosphere for advising the Liberal Party to "invoke a culture war" on the Harper Conservatives. "I told them that they should invoke a culture war. Cosmopolitanism versus parochialism, secularism versus moralism, Obama versus Palin, tolerance versus racism and homophobia, democracy versus autocracy. If the cranky old men in Alberta don't like it, too bad. Go south and vote for Palin."

It was good advice for the Liberals then and it's good advice today for Jack Layton and the NDP. But whether the temporarily triumphalist NDP has the imagination to take on such a fight remains to be seen. It's a higher risk strategy than the party seems to want to take and the longer they avoid it, the tougher it will be. Social democrats and liberals have become far too timid in the past two decades defending what they stand for and what they built in the post-war period. 1,352 words.
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Was the assassination of bin Laden just one more Washington lie?

Former CIA agent claims bin Laden died five years ago

Pravda Ru

19 May 2011 MOSCOW — Osama bin Laden died a natural death nearly 5 years before it was announced that he was eliminated by the American commandos.
 
This sensational statement was made by a Turkish politician, and a former U.S. intelligence agent.
 
In an interview with Russia's Channel One, he said that the Americans simply found and opened the tomb of the leader of al-Qaeda. 776 words.
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20,000 tenants want Toronto city to force

slum landlords to clean up their act — now

Chloé Fedio
The Toronto Star
 
19 July 2011 — It costs $1,100 a month to rent a three-bedroom apartment in the tower at 10 San Romanoway — but Glenice Edwards could do without the cockroaches.
 
Her city councillor agrees that bugs are a common problem in the Jane and Finch corridor — and that the city should act faster to force landlords to clean up their act.
 
But despite four years worth of complaints, the landlord of her 34-storey building “hasn’t done a thing,” Edwards said. 507 words.
 
 
True North Perspective publishes in
the best traditions of Canadian journalism
 
If you think it's too radical, please read
 
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Wisdom is a result of a happy marriage between intelligence and experience.
© Carl Dow, Editor and Publisher, True North Perspective
 
 
Editor's Notes
 
True North Perspective
Vol. 6, No. 25 (284)
Friday, July 22, 2011

The problem with Pakistan is energy-hungry China

lurking in the wings with pipeline know-how and aid

For several weeks now I've been promising myself to take the time to tap out a few words on Washington's problem with Islamabad, capital of Pakistan.

The question that dominates is why the U.S. tolerates Pakistan as if it were a cherished spoiled brat. Since 2001 Washington has paid Pakistan $8.9 billion from its Coalition Support funds. The money is meant to pay for the costs of maintaining Pakistani troops in the tribal area bordering Afghanistan.

Despite Pakistan's claim that it has 1,100 border check points the Taliban continue to trek back and forth with relatively moderate interference.

In recent days Washington has said it will withhold $800 million in payments to Islamabad.

Ahmad Mukhtar, Pakistan's defence minister, responded with a shrug in an interview with Express 24/7 a Pakistani news channel, "The next step is that the government or armed forces will remove these soldiers from the border." 747 words.

"News is what (certain) people want to keep hidden. Everything else is just publicity."
-- PBS journalist Bill Moyers.
 
Your support makes it possible for True North to clear the fog of "publicity" and keep you informed on what's really happening in the world today. Please send your donation to:
 
Carl Dow, True North, Station E, P.O. Box 4814, Ottawa ON Canada K1S 5H9.
 
Or use our new Paypal system! Just click the secure link below —
and if you're paying by credit card, you don't need a PayPal account to make a donation!
 
 
 
Conservative values
 
 
 
By Jeff Davis
The National Post
 
18 July 2011, OTTAWA — The cost of the federal prison system has risen 86% since the Harper government took over in 2006, government reports show.

When the Conservatives came to power in 2005-06, Canada’s federal corrections system cost nearly $1.6-billion per year, but the projected cost for 2011-12 has increased to $2.98-billion per year.

 
 
CBC News
 
21 July 2011 — Canada's crime rate is the lowest in nearly 40 years, according to Statistics Canada, as the volume of crime dropped five per cent in 2010 from the year before.
 
"The national crime rate has been falling steadily for the past 20 years and is now at its lowest level since 1973," Statistics Canada reported.384 words.

“That is a humungous increase of over 80%,” said Justin Piche, an assistant professor of sociology at Memorial University in St. John’s, N.L., who analyzes the costs of Canada’s prisons.

“Canadians are going to be spending a lot more on their prisons, and this is just the beginning.”

Figures on the cost of Canada’s federal corrections system appear in the annual Reports on Plans and Priorities of the Correctional Service of Canada.

By 2013-14, the cost of the federal penitentiary system will have almost doubled to $3.147-billion, according to budget projections. 826 words.
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Energy strategy talks welcome but long overdue

Canada's resources demand we think big on world scale

By Alex Binkley
True North Perspective

22 July 2011 — Canada has a potentially winning hand in the global energy sweepstakes. Now, we have to play our cards smartly.

If we do, our economy and environment will both be winners. And we can set a good example for the rest of the world.

But we need an open public debate and leadership to get Canadians engaged. And we need a forum so all the players can speak up so all the related issues get discussed.

As we have a government with a four-year mandate, it should create a special Parliamentary committee with adequate resources to work on the issue and hold hearings across the country. It’s vital in this exercise that Canadians come to understand what’s at stake but also what we’re capable of. Issues surrounding the oil sands, shale gas and nuclear power should all included in the mix. 928 words.
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From the Desk of Dennis Carr, Sustainability Editor

Called 'The Mechanic' and under RCMP heat

Harper's oil sands front man fades from spotlight

Bruce Carson's fingerprints on 'National Energy Strategy'

By Geoff Dembicki
TheTyee.ca
 
21 July 2011 VANCOUVER B.C. — When Canadian energy ministers met recently in Kanananskis, Alberta, a former top advisor to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, now under investigation by the RCMP, was nowhere to be seen.

But the oil sands-friendly "national energy strategy" pushed hard by the Albertan and federal governments had Bruce Carson's fingerprints all over it, green observers say.

"He really laid the groundwork for what happened in Kanananskis," Greenpeace Canada's Keith Stewart, who has blogged extensivelyabout Carson, told the Tyee. "The ghost of Bruce Carson was definitely at that meeting." 991 words.
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Bits and Bites of Everyday Life

Don't worry! Be happy!

Worry never robs tomorrow of its sorrow, it only saps today of its joy.
Leo Buscaglia
True North Perspective

Alberte Villeneuve-Sinclair is the author of The Neglected Garden and two French novels. Visit her website to learn more www.albertevilleneuve.ca.

22 July 2011 — Summer should really be a time to relax, soak in the sun and enjoy special activities outdoors.
 
Feeling happy is easy when golden sunlight filters through the open patio door and you wake up to the sound of birds singing on a beautiful day.
 
Feeling happy is easy when you’re sharing a wonderful dinner in a quiet restaurant or on a patio with a good friend or a loved one. Feeling happy is easy when a soft evening breeze caresses your face as you watch a gorgeous sunset and look into your partner’s eyes.1,093 words.
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Spirit Quest

 
 
By The Rev. Dr. Hanns F. Skoutajan
True North Perspective

22 July 2011 — The bodies of dead birds were scattered over the plaza among the towers of the financial district of Toronto. It had been a bad night for the flights from the south. On arrival in Toronto they became disoriented by the lights of the skyscrapers and like 9/11 flew into them but without the lethal intention.

Toronto lies in the heart of one of the busiest migratory bird routes in North America. It is not only Canada’s largest city spreading east and west and far into the north but also upward into the sky. Each year as many as a million birds die in collision with those towers of light.

As I sit with my first cuppa of the day on my balcony I am serenaded by those wonderful songbirds, those that have made it once again past all sorts of barriers that human technology has erected against nature. 815 words.
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Talking with the BBC!

Listen to the Rev. Hanns Skoutajan on the BBC World Service programme, Outlook, in conversation with host Matthew Bannister. Dr. Skoutajan discusses his eperiences as a refugee and his later work meeting newcomers and encouraging refugee sponsoships.
 
Click here to listen to the program, or paste http://www.bbc.co.uk/search/?q=skoutajan into your browser and look for programs dated June 22 and June 25, 2011.
ParkTales

Frances discovers a strange sudden scarcity

By Frances Sedgwick
True North Perspective

Frances Sedgwick's keen eye and ear for the human condition reveals the heart and soul of Parkdale in southwest Toronto, one of the country's most turbulent urban areas where the best traditions of human kindness prevail against powerful forces that would grind them down. True North Perspective proudly presents a column by writer Frances Sedgwick. Her critical observation combined with a tender sense of humour will provide you with something to think about ... and something to talk about.

22 July 2011 — On the subway returning from my husband's nursing home, I looked around me, I only saw three, yes just three. I mentioned this to the young man sitting next to me.
 
I said isn't it interesting I only see three and usually I see at least fifteen? He replied I think it's just this particular car.  I said maybe, but remained very curious.
 
The next day on my way to Harbour Front to meet a friend, again I looked around the subway car and only saw one. 
 
Gee only one.
 
I mentioned this to the young lady sitting next to me, did you notice there is only one? She looked around and said, yes you're right, there is only one.  Then she said, "must  be this particular subway car."  Hmm, same answer to the same question. 296 words
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From the Desk of Darren Jerome

 

 

 

 

Canadian Centre for Investigative Reporting

supports two journalists who exposed

Bill Clinton's Haitian classrooms as disease traps

What may look good on paper may not look good on the ground. Hurricane proof shelters are not hurricane proof

Isabel Macdonald is a Montreal-based journalist whose investigative reporting for The Nation and other publications has been featured on ABC’s Good Morning America, MSNBC and Democracy Now! Isabeau Doucet is a Port-au-Prince–based freelance producer for Al Jazeera English and a reporter for The Nation and other publications. This article was reported in partnership with The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute, with additional support from the Canadian Centre for Investigative Reporting. 4,167 words.
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Posted by Lauren McKeon Investigative Journalism

How we got the story: Shelters in Haiti, Part I

20 July 2011 — After the earthquake in Haiti last year, plenty of organizations rushed in to help. One of those was former U.S. president Bill Clinton's foundation, which promised to build several "hurricane-proof" shelter/school duos. However, in a recent investigation published by the Canadian Centre for Investigative Reporting (CCIR) two journalists discovered promises that look good on paper don't always look great on the ground. This week, we talk to the CCIR executive director Bilbo Poynter about how the organization supported this investigation, and others. Next week: Isabel Macdonald and Isabeau Doucet on how they got the story.

J-Source: Next week, we are putting a focus on how reporters got the Haiti story. Can you expand on the Centre’s role in the story?

Bilbo Poynter: I don’t recall exactly the timeline, but it wasn’t all that long ago that Isabel McDonald got in touch with the pitch. Her and Isabeau Doucet had come across the circumstance with the trailers and the questions it raised. Both had prior experience in Haiti. Isabeau is a stringer in Haiti, currently.

They basically set the stage for me and told me what the story was. It sounded exactly like the type of story we’d be interested in. Isabel and I had a couple of prior conversations and I knew of her reporting background, so I knew that she had a good sense of what was a worthy story. I said I’d be very interested to pursue this, and knew that I had some – what we would term as general research funds – that could be applied to it. We went from there. 1,217 words.
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China Mobile exec sentenced to death

for selling favours worth $1.1 million U.S.

The Globe and Mail

21 July 2011, BEIJING — A former deputy chairman of state-owned China Mobile Ltd., the world’s biggest phone company by subscribers, was convicted Friday of taking bribes and given a suspended death sentenced. 243 words.
 

Always worth repeating

'Give us the tools and we'll finish the job'

— Winston Churchill

Let's say that news throughout human time has been free. Take that time when Ugh Wayne went over to the cave of Mugh Payne with news that the chief of his group had broken a leg while chasing his laughing wife around the fire. That news was given freely and received as such with much knowing smiles and smirks to say nothing of grunts of approval or disapproval. — 688 words.


 
Report from Obama's America

Torture and 'disappearance' comes to America

'The collapse of the moral universe of the torturers is displayed when, between torture sessions, the guards take Villani and a few pregnant women prisoners to an amusement park. They make them ride the kiddie train and then take them to a cafe for a beer. A guard, whose nom de guerre is Blood, brings his 6- or 7-year-old daughter into the detention facility to meet Villani and other prisoners ... The way torture became routine, part of daily work, numbed the torturers to their own crimes. They saw it as a job. Years later they expected their victims to view it with the same twisted logic.'
By Chris Hedges
TruthDig via TruthOut
18 July 2011 — We Americans have rewritten our laws, as the Argentines did, to make criminal behavior legal. John Rizzo, the former acting general counsel for the CIA, approved drone attacks that have killed hundreds of people, many of them civilians in Pakistan, although we are not at war with Pakistan. Rizzo has admitted that he signed off on so-called enhanced interrogation techniques. He told Newsweek that the CIA operated “a hit list.” He asked in the interview: “How many law professors have signed off on a death warrant?” Rizzo, in moral terms, is no different from the deported Argentine doctor Bianco, and this is why lawyers in Britain and Pakistan are calling for his extradition to Pakistan to face charges of murder. Let us hope they succeed.

We know of at least 100 detainees who died during interrogations at our “black sites,” many of them succumbing to the blows and mistreatment of our interrogators. There are probably many, many more whose fate has never been made public. Tens of thousands of Muslim men have passed through our clandestine detention centers without due process. “We tortured people unmercifully,” admitted retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey. “We probably murdered dozens of them … both the armed forces and the C.I.A.”1,536 words.

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to release Cuban 5 anti-terrorists

14 July 2011 HAVANA — Members of the African-American community in the United States have sent a letter to President Barack Obama urging him to free the five Cuban anti-terrorists imprisoned in that country for close to 13 years.

The initiative taken by Joan P. Gibbs, member of the National Conference of Black Lawyers (NCBL), and Rosemari Mealy, author of the book Fidel & Malcolm X: Memories of a Meeting, the letter was backed by hundreds of activists in solidarity with the cause of the Cuban Five. 376 words.
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OPEC says Venezuela has world’s largest oil reserves

By CORREO DEL ORINOCO INTERNATIONAL

22 July 2011 — OPEC’s proven crude oil reserves rose 12.1 percent in 2010 to 1.19 trillion barrels led by Venezuela, which has surpassed Saudi Arabia as the group’s largest reserves holder, OPEC said in its Annual Statistical Bulletin. OPEC’s growth in oil reserves was mainly due to Venezuela, whose holdings climbed to 296.5 billion barrels from 211.2 billion in 2009, the report said. Top OPEC exporter Saudi Arabia’s reserves were steady at 264.5 billion barrels. 401 words.
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'Current … journalism … is once-over-lightly history that bears little relation to reality' 

Vietnam is a Haunting Legacy to which

American presidents should pay attention

By Arnaud De Borchgrave
United Press International

'Last week, a ranking Iraqi official on a trip to Washington, sheepishly conceded that Iran now has more influence in Iraq than the United States. The Iraq invasion and decade-long war was a trillion-dollar mistake. Too bad the Vietnam syndrome didn't prevail.'

19 July 2011, WASHINGTON — If journalism is the first draft of history, the current phase of journalism with blogs, tweets and miscellaneous bells and whistles is once-over-lightly history that bears little relation to reality.
 
Mercifully, there are exceptions. Some journalists still spend five or more years researching a subject they already know well and that has already generated scores of books -- but the brass ring on history's carousel is infuriatingly elusive. 1.023 words.
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Third Ways
 
 
By Marcin Jakubowski
TED.com
   
 
Annals of Education
 
 
By Clive Thompson
Wired.com
15 July 2011 — “This,” says Matthew Carpenter, “is my favorite exercise.” I peer over his shoulder at his laptop screen to see the math problem the fifth grader is pondering. It’s an inverse trigonometric function: cos-1(1) = ?
 
Carpenter, a serious-faced 10-year-old wearing a gray T-shirt and an impressive black digital watch, pauses for a second, fidgets, then clicks on “0 degrees.” Presto: The computer tells him that he’s correct. The software then generates another problem, followed by another, and yet another, until he’s nailed 10 in a row in just a few minutes. All told, he’s done an insane 642 inverse trig problems. “It took a while for me to get it,” he admits sheepishly.
 
Carpenter, who attends Santa Rita Elementary, a public school in Los Altos, California, shouldn’t be doing work anywhere near this advanced. In fact, when I visited his class this spring—in a sun-drenched room festooned with a papercraft X-wing fighter and student paintings of trees—the kids were supposed to be learning basic fractions, decimals, and percentages. As his teacher, Kami Thordarson, explains, students don’t normally tackle inverse trig until high school, and sometimes not even then. 6,083 words.
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Reality Check

10 years after legalizing ALL drugs,

Portugal's drug use is lowest in Western world

Spread of HIV and other diseases also drastically reduced
 
14 July 2011 —  The government in Portugal has no plans to back down.

Although the Netherlands is the European country most associated with liberal drug laws, it has already been ten years since Portugal became the first European nation to take the brave step of decriminalizing possession of all drugs within its borders — from marijuana to heroin, and everything in between.

This controversial move went into effect in June of 2001, in response to the country’s spiraling HIV/AIDS statistics.

While many critics in the poor and largely conservative country attacked the sea change in drug policy, fearing it would lead to drug tourism while simultaneously worsening the country’s already shockingly high rate of hard drug use, a report published in 2009 by the Cato Institute tells a different story.769 words.

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Money and Markets

The 'Lesser Depression' is upon us

Can politicians avoid leading us all to catastrophe?

By Paul Krugman
The New York Times
 
21 July 2011 — These are interesting times — and I mean that in the worst way. Right now we’re looking at not one but two looming crises, either of which could produce a global disaster.
 
In the United States, right-wing fanatics in Congress may block a necessary rise in the debt ceiling, potentially wreaking havoc in world financial markets.
 
Meanwhile, if the plan just agreed to by European heads of state fails to calm markets, we could see falling dominoes all across southern Europe — which would also wreak havoc in world financial markets.818 words.
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The solution to music and movie piracy is ... more piracy?!?
 
 
By Matthew Humphries
Geek.com

20 July 2011 — The movie and music industry seem hell bent on portraying pirates as criminals and parasites who cost both industries billions of dollars in lost sales. In order to prove this fact a number of studies are commissioned to help demonstrate the effect a pirate has on sales of entertainment.
 
The problem with this approach is that it has been found to be biased towards portraying pirates as the movie industry wants them to be seen, rather than presenting the facts. A great example of this has been discovered by the German-language politics and media website Telepolis.
 
The study states that it is much more typical for a pirate to download an illegal copy of a movie to try it before purchasing. They are also found to purchase more DVDs than the average consumer, and they visit the movie theater more, especially for opening weekend releases which typically cost more to attend. —  424 words.
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Health Watch

Are chemicals making us fat?

New evidence suggests it's not just people that are getting fatter; both domestic and wild animals living near humans are gaining weight
 
By Dr. Brian Moench
TruthOut

20 July 2011 —  The global obesity/diabetes epidemic is receiving wide-spread attention like the June 26 article in The Washington Post by David Brown. One-fourth of our national health care bill of $2.3 trillion is linked to the treatment of diabetes and its complications. Average American life expectancy is now dropping because of this disease complex. Even children are being recommended for gastric bypass.

Fingers everywhere are pointing at the usual suspects but there is much more to the story than a recent, contagious lack of discipline among the masses.

A growing body of evidence in animals and humans suggests that many man-made chemicals contaminating our environment mimic some of the body's own hormones like testosterone and estrogen. 849 words.

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Science
 
 
The Australian

19 July 2011 — Russia launched into space its Spektr-R radio telescope planned to be the most powerful ever on July 19, 2011, the first deep space observatory sent up by Moscow in a quarter of a century.

Spektr-R will scour the fringes of the universe for black holes, mysterious quasar radio sources and also the fast-rotating stellar remnants known as pulsars, Russian space agency Roskosmos said in a statement.

The instrument, dubbed the "Russian Hubble" after the iconic US space telescope but many thousands of times more powerful, will give astronomers new opportunities for looking billions of light years back in time to the young universe and unlocking the mysteries of black holes. 612 words.

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By Alexandra Nikolchev
PBS.org
 
15 July 2011 — Google announced the winning results of its first science fair last week. More than 10,000 applicants from 91 countries entered the online contest.
 
As you may have heard by now, the winners were all girls: Shree Bose (17-18 age group), Naomi Sha (15-16 age group) and Lauren Hodge (13-14 age group) each won first place in their respective age categories.

This is a significant moment for girls in science, as well as a much-needed reminder of the importance of encouraging talented girls and women to stay in a field where they have been historically underrepresented.  — 769 words.

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The Glass Teat

Torchwood: Miracle Day, part 2: Rendition

Thugs on a Plane

By Geoffrey Dow
Managing Editor, True North Perspective
Originally published at Edifice Rex Online

An unabashed (if often critical) fan of all things Doctor Who, Geoffrey Dow is writing about Torchwood: Miracle Day each week. Click here to for an overview and links to all the postings.

18 July 2011 — "Rendition" starts where "The New World" left off. Rex Matheson is gloating over his capture of Jack, Gwen, Rys and the baby. For some reason, only when they have reached the waiting plane does he announce that only Jack and Gwen are wanted on the voyage; Rys and the baby will be staying behind. (Here we have a minor revelation in the form of Eve Myles, who for once shows us that Gwen Cooper is a force to be reckoned with.)
 
The story, from the keyboard of Doris Egan, a writer with an extensive portfolio (as well as a blog), but whose work is new to me), is uneven in a way that suggests interference from the heavy hand of Russell T Davies, Show-Runner, adding a little continuity here, some political commentary there. Nevertheless, "Rendition" is a good deal more entertaining than was the opening instalment of Torchwood: Miracle Day.926 words.
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Remember Captain Canuck?

Canadian super-hero slated to appear on silver screen

TheRecord.com

20 July 2011 — Move over Captain America, there’s a new superhero headed to the multiplex — Captain Canuck.

Minds Eye Entertainment of Regina, Sask., announced Tuesday it has picked up the movie rights to the Canadian comic book superhero from writer/creator and Cambridge resident Richard Comely, who introduced the character in 1975.

“He’s a Canadian superhero and when Richard contacted me, it was like a dream come true,” said David Cormican, head of development at Minds Eye.  — 277 words.

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Sports
 

 

He's gotta be soccer goal-keeper of the century

 
   
 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the County or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna, a groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.


   

You can count on the True North Team

While publishers are cutting back and that includes in-house editors

Outside editors of the True North Team are rescuing writers from oblivion.

We handle fiction and memoirs and full-length books

Manuscript editing to ghost writing

Everything to put the best face on your work to publishers and the reading public

For a free consultation please don't hesitate to contact

carl.dow@truenorthperspective.com

or Carl Dow at 613-233-6225

Always looking forward ...

Note from the heart of the empire

 
   

You can count on the True North Team

While publishers are cutting back and that includes in-house editors

Outside editors of the True North Team are rescuing writers from oblivion.

We handle fiction and memoirs and full-length books

Manuscript editing to ghost writing

Everything to put the best face on your work to publishers and the reading public

For a free consultation please don't hesitate to contact

carl.dow@truenorthperspective.com

or Carl Dow at 613-233-6225

Always looking forward ...

Note from the heart of the empire

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

Ottawa writers hit their stride producing quality

and bestsellers in books, short stories and poetry

(Be sure to read the award winning short story below, Ball Hockey and Other Blood Sports, by Mel Massey. International Commercial lawyer who retired recently to nurture his enthusiasm for creative writing among other projects.)

By Carl Dow
Editor and Publisher
True North Perspective

There is a joyful creative spirit generating in Ottawa, Canada's capital, as hard-working writers reveal intelligence, imagination, humour, and wisdom.

Leading the sales pack so far is Randy Ray, journalist and publicist, whose books provide, in a light but insightful way, facts and figures as to how Canada became a country and how it works. His books, in collaberation with Mark Kearney of London, Ontario, have sold more than 50,000 copies. Not bad when one considers that in Canada a bestseller mark is 5,000 copies. — 324 words.

Ottawa writers hit their stride producing quality

and bestsellers in books, short stories and poetry

(Be sure to read the award winning short story below, Ball Hockey and Other Blood Sports, by Mel Massey. International Commercial lawyer who retired recently to nurture his enthusiasm for creative writing among other projects.)

By Carl Dow
Editor and Publisher
True North Perspective

There is a joyful creative spirit generating in Ottawa, Canada's capital, as hard-working writers reveal intelligence, imagination, humour, and wisdom.

Leading the sales pack so far is Randy Ray, journalist and publicist, whose books provide, in a light but insightful way, facts and figures as to how Canada became a country and how it works. His books, in collaberation with Mark Kearney of London, Ontario, have sold more than 50,000 copies. Not bad when one considers that in Canada a bestseller mark is 5,000 copies. — 324 words

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