Friday 08 July 2011

 

Walkom: Assessing the brutal, pointless Afghan war

Canada needs to reconsider its relationship with NATO

By Thomas Walkom
The Toronto Star

7 July 2011 — On Tuesday, Canada officially ended its combat mission in Afghanistan. It should never have started.

The war has been a dismal failure. It did not achieve its primary aim of capturing or killing terror chief Osama Bin Laden. A U.S. assassination squad operating in Pakistan finally did that.

Nor has it defeated the Taliban. As Canadian and other NATO-led troops prepare for their final 2014 withdrawal, the insurgents remain dangerous, active and unbowed.

They will almost certainly be playing a role in government again — probably soon.

The war did not bring stability or meaningful democracy to Afghanistan. President Hamid Karzai heads a notoriously corrupt government. He and Afghan’s parliament are at loggerheads. Lawlessness is rampant. 601 words.
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Canada Foundation finds Venezuela beats

Canada and the U.S. for election fairness

Whopping score of 85% for Venezuela against 26% for Canada and 30% for U.S.

By Juan Reardon
venezuelanalysis.com

07 July 2011 CARACAS Venezuela — This week Venezuela’s Social Investigation Group XXI (GIS) released new comparative data on electoral fairness in the country compiled by the Canada-based Foundation for Democratic Advancement (FDA) which found Venezuela’s elections to be “exceptionally fair, and thereby highly democratic.”

 After a thorough review of Venezuela’s electoral laws and regulations on political news coverage as it relates to elections, equality of campaign financing, equality of candidate and party influence, as well as equality of voter influence, the FDA gave the country a score of 85% in overall “electoral fairness.” In comparison, the United States and Canada scored 30% and 26%, respectively. 813 words

 
 
True North Perspective publishes in
the best traditions of Canadian journalism
 
If you think it's too radical, please read
 
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Wisdom is a result of a happy marriage between intelligence and experience.
© Carl Dow, Editor and Publisher, True North Perspective
 
Editor's Notes
 
True North Perspective
Vol. 6, No. 23 (282)
Friday, July 08, 2011

Venezuela is a democratic success story

Against a background of brutal rightwing military dictatorships in Latin America and ruthless attempts by Washington in spending hundreds of millions of dollars to foment disruption and failure, Venezuela remains firm in its pursuit of democracy.

Washington, not satisfied with its seven wars in the Middle East and Africa, is drumming its fingers impatiently on more of its stack of humanitarian bombs that it's itching to hurl at Venezuela and a number of other Latin American countries. 274 words.
"News is what (certain) people want to keep hidden. Everything else is just publicity."
-- PBS journalist Bill Moyers.
 
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From the Desk of Dennis Carr, Sustainability Editor

Sharkonomics

What's good for sharks is good for the economy

By Juliet Eilperin
Slate Magazine

Posted Thursday, June 30, 2011

Which is better for sharks, communism or capitalism?

You have probably not given a moment's thought to how ideological leanings affect the creatures that have swum in our oceans for nearly 400 million years. But it turns out that the transition between economic systems—from barter economies and feudal ones, to communism and capitalism—has had profound impacts on great whites, whale sharks, and a host of other sharks.

The state of the Chinese economy didn't really matter to sharks until a thousand years ago. (That's a blip in time, from the sharks' perspective, given that they emerged during the Devonian period.) During the Sung Dynasty, between 960 and 1279, a small group of elites began consuming noodles made from the cartilage in sharks' fins, a dish known as shark's fin soup. The dish gained popularity during the Ming Dynasty in the 15th century, when a Chinese admiral named Cheng Ho traveled to Africa and brought back fins that African villagers discarded in favor of the meat. Shark's fin soup became a standard offering in formal banquets during the Ming Dynasty. 864 words.
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Try it Liberals, new ideas might help win back

public support; next election is not that far away 

By Alex Binkley
True North Perspective

8 July 2011 — The beating the Liberals suffered in the May 2 election has the party in dire need of finding its place in the middle of the political spectrum. Otherwise, it will be submerged by the Conservatives and NDP.

So far, it has staggered along. It has far less time in Question Period to stake out its positions and has fallen back on tired old ideas rather than looking for new approaches. Certainly, the party is still shell shocked by the shellacking it took.

If it doesn’t use the summer break, (parliament is off until September 19), to start charting a new course then the party will continue to founder in political irrelevancy. 641 words.
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By Erica Johnson
CBC News
 
6 July 2011 —  An Ontario cancer researcher is concerned that the Canadian Cancer Society has proportionally shifted funding away from research and is spending more of its dollars on fundraising and administration costs.

"Most scientists don’t realize that the budget has been going up and up, and donations have been growing, but the budget for research has been shrinking," said Brian Lichty, a researcher at McMaster University who is looking into treating cancer with viruses that kill tumours. "So they are surprised and disappointed when they find out that this is the case, and the trend."680 words.

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By Jessica Leeder
The Globe and Mail
 
7 July 2011 —  They’re far from getting top marks, but all eight of Canada’s supermarket chains have been applauded by Greenpeace for implementing policies on seafood sustainability.

Still, just three of Canada’s eight chains – the national giant Loblaw, Overwaitea Food Group and Safeway – got passing grades from the global environmental advocacy group in its annual report card on seafood sustainability to be released on Thursday. Chains that failed were Sobeys, Wal-Mart, Metro, Federated Co-operatives and the retail wholesaler Costco.

“Canada’s supermarket chains are beginning to walk the talk and turning sustainability commitments to action on supermarkets’ shelves,” said Sarah King, Greenpeace’s oceans campaign co-ordinator.667 words.

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Bits and Bites of Everyday Life

I have a feeling there's one more star in the sky

 
True North Perspective

Alberte Villeneuve-Sinclair is the author of The Neglected Garden and two French novels. Visit her website to learn more www.albertevilleneuve.ca.

8 July 2011 — Once more, I’ve had to face loss! This time, my beloved sister-in-law and special soul sister, Arline, passed away on July 2nd. She had been battling ovarian cancer since 2010. For a while, after aggressive surgery and grueling chemotherapy sessions, it looked as if the cancer was in remission but it reared its ugly head again.
 
The last time I spoke to Arline, she warned me she would not recover. Like Brian when he battled lung cancer, she preferred being home in familiar surroundings to being in the hospital. Arrangements were made so she could have proper care at home. She passed away in the afternoon of that second day of July. I had called on Canada Day to wish her well and hear her voice once again but my call went unanswered and I suspected then she was back in the hospital.1,742 words.
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Spirit Quest

English and French CBC radio embody the Spirit of Canada

You have a chance now to let the CRTC know what you think

By The Rev. Dr. Hanns F. Skoutajan
True North Perspective

8 July 2011 — What is the Spirit of Canada? It is a question that I have often asked myself but particularly on special occasions such as last week’s Canada Day. Inasmuch as I call this weekly essay Spirit Quest I have reason to pursue a quest for our nation’s spirit.

Undoubtedly the Spirit of Canada is embodied in many things for many different people. For some, I suppose, in far off Kandahar, an area of extreme dust and danger, quite unlike this land, the presence of a Tim Horton must give the lonesome soldier a sense of the warm fuzzies. 

I recall in the days when I studied abroad I would go out of my way to pass by a travel office that had an ad for Trans Canada Airlines, now of course Air Canada, in their window. I gave it a friendly nod.

For others all across Canada in the midst of icy blasts from the true north, skating on a pond wielding a hockey stick and keeping warm with a Toronto Maple Leaf sweater, the spirit is precisely that, The Toronto Maple Leafs. Apologies to Roche Carrier author of Hockey Sweater.

The spirit is evident in many things, however for me, the Spirit of Canada is none other than CBC Radio. It is what wakes me in the morning and has the last word at night. 979 words.
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and bestsellers in books, short stories and poetry

(Be sure to read the award winning short story below, Ball Hockey and Other Blood Sports, by Mel Massey, International Commercial lawyer who retired recently to nurture his enthusiasm for creative writing among other projects.)

By Carl Dow
Editor and Publisher
True North Perspective
 
There is a joyful creative spirit generating in Ottawa, Canada's capital, as hard-working writers reveal intelligence, imagination, humour, and wisdom.
 
Leading the sales pack so far is Randy Ray, journalist and publicist, whose books www.triviaguys.com provide in a light, entertaining, and insightful style, facts, figures, and stories on how Canada became a country and how it works. His books, in collaboration with Mark Kearney of London, Ontario, have sold more than 50,000 copies. Not bad when one considers that in Canada a bestseller mark is 5,000 copies. — 324 words.
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Report from Obama's America
 
 
Considering the ongoing carnage, even as Canada's troops 'end' their combat mission
 
By Gareth Porter
Truth-Out.org
 
6 July 2011  — A few days after Barack Obama's December 2009 announcement of 33,000 more troops being sent to Afghanistan, in testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Defense Secretary Robert Gates advanced the official justification for escalation: the Afghan Taliban would not abandon its ties with al-Qaeda unless forced to do so by US military force and the realization that "they're likely to lose."

Gates claimed to see an "unholy alliance" of the Afghan Taliban, al-Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban emerging during 2009. Unless the United States succeeded in weakening the Taliban in Afghanistan, al-Qaeda would have safe haven in Afghanistan, just as they had before the 9/11 attacks, according to Gates.

Even in comparison with the usual lies that justify wars, this one was a whopper.2,389 words.

From the Desk of Darren Jerome

 

 

 

 

Bradley Manning’s Army of One

 

 

How a lonely, five-foot-two, gender-questioning soldier became a WikiLeaks hero, a traitor to the U.S., and one of the most unusual revolutionaries in American history.

 
By Steve Fishman
Reader Supported News
 
3 July 2011 — On the night of February 21, 2009, a year before Army private Bradley E. Manning allegedly leaked the largest cache of classified information in American history, he sat at a computer in his barracks at Fort Drum in upstate New York. It was a Saturday in midwinter, and the barracks were nearly empty. He pulled a chair up to the computer in his cinder-block room, briefly debated between a pizza and a sandwich from Domino’s, went with the sandwich, and passed over into his “digital existence,” as he thought of it. He logged on to AOL’s instant-messenger service under the handle Bradass87, and off he went to transform himself. On the web, he could be whomever he chose.

Among fellow soldiers, Manning had to conceal the basic facts of his sexual orientation. On the web, he was proudly out and joined a “Repeal Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” group. He’d even begun to explore switching his gender, chatting with a counselor about the steps a person takes to transition from male to female.

On the web, being one thing didn’t mean you couldn’t be another. And for all of his boundary-crossing and self-­exploration online, he was, at first, a committed soldier. In fact, he was gung ho, eager to put his technical expertise to use for the cause—he had the skills of a ­hacker, though at that point, he didn’t yet have the ideology. The Army had trained him at Fort Huachuca as an intelligence analyst. “With my current position,” he wrote to ZJ with a new graduate’s earnestness, “i can apply what i learn to provide more information to my officers and commanders, and hopefully save lives … i feel a great responsibility and duty to people.”

Not that Manning’s conception of patriotic duty would have met with the approval of his superiors. His methods were hardly standard operating procedure. “In public eye, US intel services are mysterious; in the real world, intelligence is a goofy, clunky, and annoying process,” he wrote to ZJ. “drives me NUTS … luckily i use my DC contacts from Starbucks and get the word out to those higher up in the chain.” Click here for full story.
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By Nadine Bells
Yahoo! News
1 July 2011 — Stanley Baker asked for a receipt.

Just days ago, the 89-year-old Michigan man paid a parking ticket by mail, adding a short apology note to the city of Orlando.

"So sorry for the delay!" he wrote. "36 years late! Better late than never!"

Not only was the payment late, it wasn't even Baker's to pay.Click here for full story.
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Money and Markets
 
 
Crushing democracy in its own cradle
 
By Peter G. Prontzos
Truth-Out.org
 
5 July 2011 — The global recession that began in the United States in 2008 hammered Greece, causing unemployment and driving up the debt. In addition, Greece has been burdened for years by a flood of refugees from the Middle East (especially Iraq and Afghanistan), Africa and even South Asia. In 2010 alone, 150,000 illegally entered the country.

The result of such factors was the creation of "odious debt" - that is, debt which is imposed on the people of a country even though they were not responsible for it and for which they received little benefit.

The "structural adjustments" demanded then are much the same as are being imposed on Greece now: higher taxes on working people, severe cuts to public services, pensions and the social safety net and up to 30 percent reduction in pay to some workers. 911 words.

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By Charlie Jane Anders
io9.com

5 July 2011 —  Yesterday was "Lady Gaga Day" in the Taiwanese city of Taichung, and the whole city went all out.

Little children dressed in post-apocalyptic space disco outfits. Women wore meat bikinis. Acrobats tumbled in front of a giant Gaga face.

Lady Gaga herself was there, performing a concert, watching children do a ceremonial Gaga dance, and receiving the key to the city.

Check out some of the most insane/awesome photos below, plus a video! —  20 photos and a video.

 

Always worth repeating

'Give us the tools and we'll finish the job'

— Winston Churchill

Let's say that news throughout human time has been free. Take that time when Ugh Wayne went over to the cave of Mugh Payne with news that the chief of his group had broken a leg while chasing his laughing wife around the fire. That news was given freely and received as such with much knowing smiles and smirks to say nothing of grunts of approval or disapproval. — 688 words.

 

Ben-Zion Shek 1927 – 2011

From blacklisted high school teacher

to a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada

The Royal Society of Canada (RSC), the Canadian institution devoted to recognizing excellence in learning and research, as well as recognizing accomplishments in the arts, humanities and sciences, since 1882.

Dr. Ben-Zion Shek, Emeritus Professor of French, University of Toronto. Author of Social Realism in the French-Canadian Novel, Montreal: Harvest House, 1977, and French-Canadian and Québécois Novels, Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1991, and numerous articles in learned journals in Canada, the U.S., and Europe. A specialist in Québécois literature, he has given papers and lectures throughout North America, Europe, Australia-New Zealand, India and China. He has also edited several important books, and was twice Associate Editor of the University of Toronto Quarterly. Dr. Shek was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2002. 1,058 words.

   

You can count on the True North Team

While publishers are cutting back and that includes in-house editors

Outside editors of the True North Team are rescuing writers from oblivion.

We handle fiction and memoirs and full-length books

Manuscript editing to ghost writing

Everything to put the best face on your work to publishers and the reading public

For a free consultation please don't hesitate to contact

carl.dow@truenorthperspective.com

or Carl Dow at 613-233-6225

Always looking forward ...

Note from the heart of the empire

 
 
By Alex Seitz-Wald
ThinkProgress.org
 
6 July 2011 — While Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s (R) law dismantling collective bargaining rights has harmed teachers, nurses, and other civil servants, it’s helping a different group in Wisconsinites — inmates.
 
Prisoners are now taking up jobs that used to be held by unionized workers in some parts of the state.

As the Madison Capital Times reports, “Besides losing their right to negotiate over the percentage of their paycheck that will go toward health care and retirement, unions also lost the ability to claim work as a ‘union-only’ job, opening the door for private workers and evidently even inmates to step in and take their place.”  — 492 words, plus video.

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Health Watch

Deadly superbug rampaging through Ontario hospitals

Improvements in hand-washing regimes not enough to off-set continued over-use of antibiotics
 
By Karen Howlett and Kim Mackrael
The Globe and Mail
 
7 July 2011 — Ontario hospitals are bracing for an influx of a highly contagious superbug that has already claimed the lives of at least 18 elderly patients in the province.

One in 14 hospitals in Ontario were dealing with an outbreak of Clostridium difficile. commonly known as C. difficile, according to statistics collected by the Ministry of Health for the month of May. While some have since been taken off the list, several others have been hit with their own outbreaks in recent weeks.894 words.

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Patient's own stem cells and 3-D 'printer' used in procedure
 
By Michelle Roberts
BBC News
 
7 July 2011 — Scientists in London created an artificial windpipe which was then coated in stem cells from the patient.

Crucially, the technique does not need a donor, and there is no risk of the organ being rejected. The surgeons stress a windpipe can also be made within days.

The 36-year-old cancer patient is doing well a month after the operation.602 words.
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Science
 
 
 
'The claim that "global warming has stopped" is simply false'
 
By Damian Carrington
The Guardian
 
4 July 2011 — The huge increase in coal-fired power stations in China has masked the impact of global warming in the last decade because of the cooling effect of their sulphur emissions, new research has revealed. But scientists warn that rapid warming is likely to resume when the short-lived sulphur pollution – which also causes acid rain – is cleaned up and the full heating effect of long-lived carbon dioxide is felt.
 
The last decade was the hottest on record and the 10 warmest years have all occurred since 1998. But within that period, global surface temperatures did not show a rising trend, leading some to question whether climate change had stopped.
 
The new study shows that while greenhouse gas emissions continued to rise, their warming effect on the climate was offset by the cooling produced by the rise in sulphur pollution. This combined with the sun entering a less intense part of its 11-year cycle and the peaking of the El Niño climate warming phenomenon.656 words.
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The Glass Teat

Considering Treme

Introduction: Lost in (outer) space

By Geoffrey Dow
Managing Editor
True North Perspective

Anybody remember Star Trek: Voyager? The 1995 edition of the Star Trek franchise was based on an idea that begged for a treatment much different from where any Star Trek had gone before but, though the program survived seven seasons, it can only be considered a colossal failure of creative nerve.

The concept was simple. Rather than yet another Starship only days or weeks away from a galactic garage, Voyager was a vessel hurled (never mind how) so far into space its crew found itself facing the prospect of a 75 year journey home.

Obviously, Voyager was going to be a study in the physical and psychological travails of a small group of people utterly isolated and aboard a vessel falling slowly into disrepair, gradual stripping away the veneer of 24th century civilization to reveal the essential characters of the men and women wearing the fraying Starfleet uniforms.

Or not. In fact, just like its episodic predecessors, but without the justification of having a Starbase just past the next star system, Voyager followed a simplistic Adventure of the Week formula. Thus, each week, scars both physical and psychological were magicked away and all was re-set to factory specifications for the next episode.

The format has its merits and has produced some excellent drama of a certain (essentially childish) kind. Even at best, it is of limited depth and certainly takes no advantage of the time available to tell a really long story.

Enter Treme, a program set in the heart of New Orleans, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Now just finished its second season, I dare to suggest we are witness not just to one of television's rare masterpieces, but to the birth of a new art-form — the long-format drama.

So let's talk about David Simon and Eric Overmyer's Treme. Let's talk about a drama that avoids cliches and tropes and easy laughs. Let's talk about what is, as one blogger put it, "a dramatic TV series that is about a city's history and culture."814 words.

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.


   

You can count on the True North Team

While publishers are cutting back and that includes in-house editors

Outside editors of the True North Team are rescuing writers from oblivion.

We handle fiction and memoirs and full-length books

Manuscript editing to ghost writing

Everything to put the best face on your work to publishers and the reading public

For a free consultation please don't hesitate to contact

carl.dow@truenorthperspective.com

or Carl Dow at 613-233-6225

Always looking forward ...

Note from the heart of the empire

 
   

You can count on the True North Team

While publishers are cutting back and that includes in-house editors

Outside editors of the True North Team are rescuing writers from oblivion.

We handle fiction and memoirs and full-length books

Manuscript editing to ghost writing

Everything to put the best face on your work to publishers and the reading public

For a free consultation please don't hesitate to contact

carl.dow@truenorthperspective.com

or Carl Dow at 613-233-6225

Always looking forward ...

Note from the heart of the empire

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

 
The Old Man's Last Sauna
 
A collection of short stories by Carl Dow

An eclectic collection of short stories that will stir your sense of humour, warm your heart, outrage your sense of justice, and chill your extra sensory faculties in the spirit of Stephen King. The final short story, the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Sauna is a ground-breaking love story.

The series begins with Deo Volente (God Willing). Followed by The Quintessence of Mr. FlynnSharing LiesFlying HighThe Richest Bitch in the Country or Ginny I Hardly Knows YaOne Lift Too ManyThe Model A Ford, the out-of-body chiller, Room For One Only and O Ernie! ... What Have They Done To You! The series closes with the collection's namesake, The Old Man's Last Saunaa groundbreaking love story. All stories may also be found in the True North Perspective Archives.

 

Ottawa writers hit their stride producing quality

and bestsellers in books, short stories and poetry

(Be sure to read the award winning short story below, Ball Hockey and Other Blood Sports, by Mel Massey. International Commercial lawyer who retired recently to nurture his enthusiasm for creative writing among other projects.)

By Carl Dow
Editor and Publisher
True North Perspective

There is a joyful creative spirit generating in Ottawa, Canada's capital, as hard-working writers reveal intelligence, imagination, humour, and wisdom.

Leading the sales pack so far is Randy Ray, journalist and publicist, whose books provide, in a light but insightful way, facts and figures as to how Canada became a country and how it works. His books, in collaberation with Mark Kearney of London, Ontario, have sold more than 50,000 copies. Not bad when one considers that in Canada a bestseller mark is 5,000 copies. — 324 words.

Ottawa writers hit their stride producing quality

and bestsellers in books, short stories and poetry

(Be sure to read the award winning short story below, Ball Hockey and Other Blood Sports, by Mel Massey. International Commercial lawyer who retired recently to nurture his enthusiasm for creative writing among other projects.)

By Carl Dow
Editor and Publisher
True North Perspective

There is a joyful creative spirit generating in Ottawa, Canada's capital, as hard-working writers reveal intelligence, imagination, humour, and wisdom.

Leading the sales pack so far is Randy Ray, journalist and publicist, whose books provide, in a light but insightful way, facts and figures as to how Canada became a country and how it works. His books, in collaberation with Mark Kearney of London, Ontario, have sold more than 50,000 copies. Not bad when one considers that in Canada a bestseller mark is 5,000 copies. — 324 words.

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